https://www.kirrt.org/story/kulwant-kaur-i-toy-maker-i-nim-wala-maur Kulwant Kaur I Toy Maker I Nim Wala Maur 2018-09-23 22:38:02 Recently, when I visited my mother, she told me about an old lady in the next village who weaves toys for children and ornamental objects for girls. My mom looked so excited to go and visit her. Gurdeep Singh Blog post Story

 

 

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Kulwant Kaur

Toy Maker
Nim Wala Maur

KUlwant Kaur
Toy maker
Nim wala Maur

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Kulwant Kaur

Recently, when I visited my mother, she told me about an old lady in the next village who weaves toys for children and ornamental objects for girls. My mom looked so excited to go and visit her. On my way to our farm I decided to drop by her house with my uncle from the same village. She had a small house, just a single room with a little courtyard around. She greeted us with a big smile and served us with water before we could even tell her the purpose of our visit. I could see around the room, the stuff she made, black horse, all kind of vegetables and fruits made of cloth and sponge, and tassels for girls. There was a lot more lying around, her work in progress. 

My uncle introduced me and my interest in her doings. When I asked her about it, it sounded so courageous to me. She lived alone, because she couldn’t get along with her son and his wife. She wasn’t getting the space she wanted and moved out. She had been making these objects from ten years. ‘I don’t like going to someone’s home and backbite, neither do I feel bored. I can spend whole day doing this, sometimes the girls from the village come around to learn. Nobody forces me to do anything here, I cook my own food and wash my own utensils.’ She says. 

Her courage amazed me but her future worried me a bit, I asked her, ‘So who do you think will take care of you when you get old’ to which she replied ‘Ha! ha! I don’t think that far but somebody will, I hope.’ Her face never left the smile. Then she showed me the stuff she had made. ‘Most of them I make for my relatives. Yesterday someone from California asked for a green chilli and a cabbage, I’m making them right now.’ I talked to her for few more minutes, took some pictures and left.

 

Recently, when I visited my mother, she told me about an old lady in the next village who weaves toys for children and ornamental objects for girls. My mom looked so excited to go and visit her. On my way to our farm I decided to drop by her house with my uncle from the same village. She had a small house, just a single room with a little courtyard around. She greeted us with a big smile and served us with water before we could even tell her the purpose of our visit. I could see around the room, the stuff she made, black horse, all kind of vegetables and fruits made of cloth and sponge, and tassels for girls. There was a lot more lying around, her work in progress. 

My uncle introduced me and my interest in her doings. When I asked her about it, it sounded so courageous to me. She lived alone, because she couldn’t get along with her son and his wife. She wasn’t getting the space she wanted and moved out. She had been making these objects from ten years. ‘I don’t like going to someone’s home and backbite, neither do I feel bored. I can spend whole day doing this, sometimes the girls from the village come around to learn. Nobody forces me to do anything here, I cook my own food and wash my own utensils.’ She says. 

Her courage amazed me but her future worried me a bit, I asked her, ‘So who do you think will take care of you when you get old’ to which she replied ‘Ha! ha! I don’t think that far but somebody will, I hope.’ Her face never left the smile. Then she showed me the stuff she had made. ‘Most of them I make for my relatives. Yesterday someone from California asked for a green chilli and a cabbage, I’m making them right now.’ I talked to her for few more minutes, took some pictures and left.

I went back home and asked my mother to definitely visit that woman. I believe our whole society is responsible for crippling my mother and millions of other women of their dreams and curiosities, for pushing them into a small bubble of everyday life which becomes impossible to escape. I hope the meeting reminds my mother of her own interests and what killed them.

I went back home and asked my mother to definitely visit that woman. I believe our whole society is responsible for crippling my mother and millions of other women of their dreams and curiosities, for pushing them into a small bubble of everyday life which becomes impossible to escape. I hope the meeting reminds my mother of her own interests and what killed them.

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